Rose Coffee

rose dalgona coffee with rose petals on a wooden board on gray surface

Rose coffee with yummy Light floral notes

Last year I went to see the cherry blossoms in Washington D.C. and tried out rose coffee from Philz. It was amazing! I was hoping to go back this year to see the blossoms and hit up Philz for rose coffee, but just wasn’t possible. So I needed to find a way to recreate the deliciousness I had at Philz coffee shop. I had stared down the baristas and all that is needed for rose coffee is to whip the rose water with milk of your choice.  So the dalgona coffee was perfect with its whipped topping for this coffee!

Rose dalgona coffee on wooden board with rose and rose petals

So, to make rose coffee you do not need to do it dalgona style but I thought it would be a fun twist!

If you do not want to make the rose coffee dalgona style simply whip rose water with milk of your choice and blend in your coffee.  Be careful not to go too heavy on the rose water, it can be intense!

A fun twist this is also adding in 1/4 tsp of cardamom powder to make it a rose cardamom coffee 😉

What is dalgona?

So, dalgona coffee has become a trend recently but it has been around for quite some time! In India, it is known as beaten coffee and is commonly made by hand. The term dalgona comes from South Korea and it has become popular in the US by that name.

It is essentially whipped coffee that is mixed with milk. Its a fun, alternative way to drink your favorite cuppa!

All you need are a handful of ingredients you likely have on hand for the base: instant coffee, sugar, water and milk.  For the rose flavor all you need is rose water.  I use Nielsen-Massey Rose Water.

Note, if you use too much rose water it can taste like a bar of floral soap! So I would start with less and work your way up, to your preference. I find Nielsen-Massey rose water to be strong so I only use 1/2 teaspoon across two cups of coffee!

Whipped Rose Dalgona Coffee Tools and Ingredients

The two key tools you need are a medium-large bowl and a wire whisk! The whisk helps to aerate the coffee.

In terms of how to make it, there are a variety of ways:

  1. Stand bowl mixer with a whisk attachment: to me this is the easiest way and the method I use. This is because once you turn it on, it will do its thing and make the coffee whipped and pillowy easily.
  2. Hand mixer
  3. Frother
  4. Whisk by hand: I only did this once and it took me about 10-11 minutes and boy was my arm tired! But it is totally doable!

All you need are a handful of ingredients you likely have on hand for the base:

  1. instant coffee (freshly brewed coffee does not whip up the same way and make the creamy foam)
  2. sugar of choice (granulated)
  3. water 
  4. milk of choice
  5. Optional for the rose flavor all you need is rose water.  I use Nielsen-Massey Rose Water.
  6. Optional: rose petals for garnish!

Note, if you use too much rose water it can taste like a bar of floral soap! So I would start with less and work your way up, to your preference. I find Nielsen-Massey rose water to be strong so I only use 1/2 teaspoon across two cups of coffee!

Rose dalgona coffee can be served either hot or cold. I originally had it hot at Philz Coffee in Washington D.C. but I enjoy it cold as well!

Process

Can I store dalgona coffee in the fridge?

Yes! To save you time or if you have made too much, you can easily store this in the fridge. I use a glass storage container that tightly seals to ensure it stays fluffy as pictured below. It will last about 4 days.

dalgona whipped foam

Can I make dalgona coffee without sugar?

Yes, you can BUT it will not hold its fluffy, pillowy form for very long.  

What types of sugar can I use?

You can use almost any type of sugar.  Brown sugar, coconut sugar, monkfruit etc. Any granulated sugar should work.

Can dalgona be made keto friendly?

Yes, you just substitute keto friendly sugar and heavy whipping cream! Saccharine such as sweet and low should work.

Types of milk

Any type of milk can be used! So this works as a vegan coffee as well.  The milk can be either hot or cold. All you do is add the whipped foam topping and enjoy!

Looking for other unique drink ideas? Check out:

Iced Cardamom Chocolate Coffee Frappucino

Coconut Cardamom Hot Chocolate 

Try it? Leave a review, love to hear feedback! Or tag me on Instagram @some_indian_girl

rose dalgona coffee with rose petals
rose dalgona coffee with rose petals on a wooden board on gray surface
rose dalgona coffee with rose petals on a wooden board on gray surface
rose dalgona coffee with rose petals on a wooden board on gray surface
rose dalgona coffee with rose petals on a wooden board on gray surface

Rose Dalgona Whipped Coffee

Shilpa Joshi
Light, creamy whipped dalgona coffee with hints of rose foral tones!
5 from 3 votes
Cook Time 10 mins
Total Time 10 mins
Course Breakfast, coffee, Drinks
Cuisine American, Indian, korean
Servings 2 cups
Calories 139 kcal

Equipment

  • medium bowl
  • wire whisk
  • mixing stand bowl (optional)

Ingredients
  

  • 2 tbsp instant coffee use caffeinated or decaf
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 2 tbsp water
  • 1 cup milk any milk
  • 1/2 tsp rose water I used Nielsen-Masey
  • rose petals garnish optional

Instructions
 

  • Add instant coffee, water, sugar and rose water to mixing bowl and whisk for 7-10 minutes (dependent on method used) until light, fluffy whipped coffee forms. Foam will hold peaks and turn a light, caramel brown color.
  • Add milk of choice to cup and spoon dalgona rose coffee topping on top
  • Optionally garnish with rose petals

Notes

Notes, a fun addition to this coffee is some cardamom powder. Add 1/4 tsp per cup for a slightly different spin!

Nutrition

Calories: 139kcalCarbohydrates: 22gProtein: 4gFat: 4gSaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 12mgSodium: 55mgPotassium: 338mgSugar: 18gVitamin A: 198IUCalcium: 145mgIron: 1mg
Keyword Dalgona, rose coffee, rose dalgona, Whipped coffee
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

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